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  • Cold weather doesn’t just affect humans, but pets and other animals, too. One police department in South Dakota shared the steps it’s taking to protect its K-9s from the snow. >> Read more trending news  The Witchita Eagle reported that the Rapid City Police Department posted video of one K-9 trying on new snow boots on its Facebook page Friday. >> Need something to lift your spirits? Read more uplifting news  “It's cold out there, which means making sure all our officers are equipped for the chilly weather; even the furry ones!” the department said in the Facebook post. “Looks like K9 Jary’s new snow boots are going to take some getting-used-to...” After some encouragement from other officers and some play time, the German shepherd appeared to get more comfortable. Watch Jary try on the boots below.
  • All lanes on Interstate 85 in Newnan, Georgia, are back open after deputies with the Coweta County Sheriff’s Office took two shooting suspects into custody.  A Coweta County Sheriff’s Department spokesperson confirmed to WSB that a suspect fired shots at officers following a high-speed chase. >> Read more trending news  The Newnan Times-Herald reported that, according to Capt. John Kennedy with the Sheriff’s Office, police saw a car thought to be a part of car burglaries on I-85 in the city limits of Newnan, Georgia. A chase ensued when officers attempted to pull the car over. A viewer sent WSB cellphone video of deputies taking one of the suspects into custody. Deputies could be seen in the video searching for the other suspect, who was suspected of having a rifle when he fled on foot, Kennedy said. The suspect jumped a barrier and shot at deputies before running into the woods. Sheriff Mike Yeager told The Newnan Times-Herald that the suspect was later found in a shed in a community airstrip along the interstate. “It was a good track and we were able to locate him and the weapon he used,” Sheriff Mike Yeager told the newspaper. “No one was hurt and everyone is in custody. It was a great example of working together with other agencies like Newnan Police, Fairburn Police along with Georgia State Patrol.”
  • Wisconsin's Democratic Gov.-elect Tony Evers said Sunday he's not optimistic that outgoing governor Scott Walker will veto bills approved by the Republican-dominated Legislature that would limit the new governor's power. Speaking on NBC's 'Meet the Press,' Evers said he talked by telephone with Walker recently and appealed to him to veto the legislation, but that Walker was noncommittal. Evers, who will be sworn in Jan. 7 after narrowly defeating the two-term Republican last month, said Wisconsin voters did not elect him to fight over administrative powers with the GOP legislative majority. He said the lame-duck legislation approved by lawmakers after an all-night session last week 'gets us off to a bad start. And I think that's a mistake.' 'But we'll continue working to get the people of Wisconsin to convince Scott Walker to think about his legacy and make sure that he vetoes this language,' Evers said. Walker has indicated that he generally supports the legislation though his office late last week said only that he was reviewing it. Walker has six days after the bills are delivered to him to either sign them into law, allow them to become law without his signature or veto them. He may also be able to line-item veto portions of them, depending on how they are drafted and whether they spend money. If Walker signs the bills, lawmakers can decide when the state can withdraw from lawsuits, and Evers would have to request permission to adjust programs that are run jointly with the federal governor, such as Medicaid. The GOP measures also would empower legislators, not new Democratic Attorney General Josh Kaul, to decide whether to withdraw Wisconsin from a lawsuit challenging the Affordable Care act. The bills also could make it harder for Evers to renegotiate a $3 billion subsidy spearheaded by Walker for a Foxconn Technology Group manufacturing facility in southeastern Wisconsin. In neighboring Michigan, where a Democrat also won the governor's office this year, Republicans are considering proposals to strip campaign-finance oversight from the new Democratic secretary of state. Lawmakers also want to have authority to intervene in lawsuits, with a Democrat poised to take control of the attorney general's office. Evers said Sunday that if Walker had won in Wisconsin, 'we wouldn't be sitting here talking about this today.' The incoming governor said the GOP moves are 'directly related' to a Democrat's win. Though Evers has said he might have to sue unless Walker vetoes the legislation, he said Sunday that 'all issues are on the table' and that he is 'not making any promises one way or the other,' 'I need to stand up for the people of Wisconsin,' Evers said. A Walker spokeswoman did not immediately respond to a request for comment Sunday.
  • When 19-year-old Damon Kemp came into court Sunday morning, he was screaming. Kemp is facing two second-degree murder charges after two 19-year-olds were found shot and killed Friday evening, according to the Daytona Beach Police Department.  >> Read more trending news  Police found Trey Ingraham and Jordan Paden shot to death in an apartment around 8 p.m., police spokeswoman Lyda Longa said. Members of the victims' families were present at the first appearance hearing.  The judge found probable cause for the charges and denied bail to Kemp.  Investigators said they believe the shooting may have occurred Thursday. Deputies initially started investigating the area after receiving reports of an armed burglary.  According to loved ones, Ingraham was a student at Bethune-Cookman University and had been taking a semester off.  Police said Kemp and the victims knew each other.  The deaths remain under investigation.
  • Poppy' and 'Bar' are gone, but the passing of George H. W. and Barbara Bush won't mean an end to children's laughter, splashing in the pool, barking dogs or clinking horseshoes at the family's property on the Maine coast. The former first couple's children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren will continue to enjoy stunning views, fishing, golfing and swimming each summer at their oceanfront home, just as previous generations have. 'It will always stay in the family,' said Evelyn Paine, a longtime family friend who has been a guest at the nearly 9-acre (3.5-hectare) oceanfront property. 'They want everyone in the family to enjoy it as much as they have.' The Walker's Point property became known as the 'Summer White House' when Bush was president, elevating the sleepy coastal community's status and making it a household name thanks to high-profile visits by world leaders, political protests and swarming journalists. The three-story, stone-and-shingle residence overlooking the Atlantic Ocean frequently served as a backdrop for reports on the nightly news. In addition to that main house, there are eight other buildings, including homes for all five of Bush's children: former President George W. Bush, former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, Dorothy 'Doro' Bush Koch, Neil Bush, and Marvin Bush. There's also a swimming pool, a tennis court and an art studio for George W. Bush. And, of course, there's a horseshoe pit for George H.W. Bush. The nation's 41st president died last month at 94 in Houston and was laid to rest Thursday in College Station, Texas. His wife died about eight months ago at 92. Bush spent part of every summer at Walker's Point since childhood with the exception of during World War II when he was a naval aviator. His wish was for the family's future generations to enjoy the property the same way he did, said Freddy Ford, chief of staff to his son, former President George W. Bush. 'Forty-one's wishes were for the family to enjoy his beloved Walker's Point for generations, and that's just what they'll do,' Ford said in a statement. Ken Raynor, another longtime family friend who golfed with the president and his kids, said there will be a void at Walker's Point. But he said Bush taught his family to continue to 'live life to the fullest.' 'It will be very active, and very alive, as 41 would like it,' he said. Paine, whose husband gave painting lessons to George W. Bush, said there was no telling who you'd encounter when paying a visit to the home. There might be local residents, a celebrity or a world leader hanging out. And there was always family around. She recalled visiting when the Bush granddaughters, Jenna and Barbara, were scooting around on tricycles. 'There's no way that the family members are going to let it go,' she said. Walker's Point is made up of three different properties, all of them owned by the same limited family partnership. The assessed value is $13.5 million, town officials say. For local residents, one of the biggest changes may be a shift in the level of security, said Town Manager Laurie Smith. Secret Service agents stayed on site during the summer when the Bushes were in Maine, maintained a checkpoint on the property and lived in the community.
  • Snowy conditions forced a South Carolina Waffle House to close Sunday.  The restaurant in Travelers Rest was locked with no indication of when it would reopen, WHNS reported.  >> Read more trending news  Upstate areas of South Carolina were expected to receive more than a foot of snow throughout the weekend, according to the National Weather Service. With more than 1,500 restaurant locations across the Southeast that are typically open 24 hours every day of the year, a closure is a big deal, so much so that federal emergency management officials informally determine how bad a storm is based on what is referred to as the Waffle House Index.  “If a Waffle House store is open and offering a full menu, the index is green. If it is open but serving from a limited menu, it’s yellow. When the location has been forced to close, the index is red. Because Waffle House is well-prepared for disasters … it’s rare for the index to hit red,” according to the Federal Emergency Management Agency.